Week 13 — In a holding pattern

We need to coin a name for this part of the renovation process.  The dust has settled, literally and figuratively, and we are using and enjoying our new space.  But we aren’t quite finished.  Let’s call it a mid-reno breather, shall we?

Because the dust really has settled, and none of the outstanding tasks will kick up more of the blasted stuff, we have had our carpets, furniture and ducts cleared of it.  Hallelujah!  There hasn’t been much point in dusting furniture with all the stuff still clogging our ductwork.  I had (belatedly) changed the furnace filter just before the duct cleaning, so I was surprised when the technician said he had replace it.  “But I just changed it”, said I.  “But it looked like this,” said he, holding up a filter that looked worse than any I have ever pulled out after 3 months, let alone 3 weeks.  Yikes!

Cleaning really did wonders for our furniture, since we had been using it in our cramped basement quarters throughout the renovation period. It was impossible to keep dust and debris away from it.   It was overdue for a cleaning prior to the reno, but it made no sense then.  Now, thanks to The Cleaning Guy, I think I may be able to live with it a little longer, until we purchase some new pieces.

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The last time my furniture cushions looked like this, my son was much younger, and loved building forts with them. This time, they are drying out after their cleaning.

Speaking of furniture, we also decided to try out some new felt pads on the dining room chair legs.  My new chairs have metal frames, and we had applied the usual sticky felts, but they were already popping off from day to day use.  In our store, we had taken on a new line called Flexi-Felt Clear, but we hadn’t tried them out.

Flexi-Felt pads are made in Canada -- hurray! Retail price is $8.99 for 4, so the legs on 6 dining chairs cost roughly as much as one of our chairs.  However, unlike the sticky pads, we won't have to replace these every year.

Flexi-Felt pads are made in Canada — hurray! Retail price is $8.99 for 4, so the legs on 6 dining chairs cost roughly as much as one of our  bargain chairs. However, unlike the sticky pads, we won’t have to replace these every year.

The idea is that the pads are attached to a clear plastic sleeve that slides over the furniture leg, so they can’t fall off.  I wasn’t sure I would like the sleeves, but it was the application that became a bigger issue.

It took all my husband's strength to apply the Flexi-Felt sleeves to our chair legs.... I couldn't do it, even with the 'tool' that was provided to help with the task.

It took all my husband’s strength to apply the Flexi-Felt sleeves to our chair legs…. I couldn’t do it, even with the ‘tool’ that was provided to help with the task.

Fortunately, we were okay with the appearance, mainly because they aren't that visible.  Best of all, they don't fall off, and they have made the chairs quieter on the hardwood floors.  We just had to spread out the installation over several evenings, because they were so exhausting to install.

Fortunately, we were okay with the appearance, mainly because they aren’t that visible. Best of all, they don’t fall off, and they have made the chairs quieter on the hardwood floors. We just had to spread out the installation over several evenings, because they were so exhausting to install!

While we were working on the dining chairs anyway, we decided to turn the dining table perpendicular to the wall, for our everyday meals. This allows for the guys to sit side by side to view the TV when Mom's not home.  And it also allows us to sit at one end of the table, without sitting side by side (when Mom's home.)  This is not our ultimate table -- it's too wide to accommodate the chairs next to the fireplace, no matter which direction we turn it.  Ultimately, we need a 36" wide table for this space.

While we were working on the dining chairs anyway, we decided to turn the dining table perpendicular to the wall, for our everyday meals. This allows for the guys to sit side by side to view the TV when Mom’s not home. And it also allows us to sit at one end of the table, without sitting side by side (when Mom’s home.) This is not our ultimate table — it’s too wide to accommodate the chairs next to the fireplace, no matter which direction we turn it. Ultimately, we need a 36″ wide table for this space.

This has been the time to get caught up on all the little jobs that are left over after a renovation.  One of those tasks is to get our security alarms and smoke detectors re-installed.  We haven’t yet found all the door sensors for our alarm system — we’re not sure if they’ve been thrown out or just misplaced.  Meanwhile, we have replaced dust-filled smoke detectors and reinstalled them. Most have gone back where they were before the renovation, with the exception of the kitchen alarm.  Previously, it was inside the kitchen, and frequently went off.  We no longer wanted it on the ceiling in the middle of the kitchen, nor did we want it on any of the ceilings in the middle of the house.

We decided to place the smoke detector on the wall above our living room cabinet, where it is as unobtrusive as possible.

We decided to place the smoke detector on the wall above our living room cabinet, where it is as unobtrusive as possible.

Another job that we’ve been putting off is the scraping of dried paint off the textured glass in our new interior doors.  I wish someone had told us how hard it would be to get the paint colour on the inside edges of the door, next to the glass panes.  After priming the doors with white and painting them in ‘Satchel’, we ended up being able to see the white primer next to the glass, along the inside edges.  We now have to go over the white with the ‘Satchel’, with a teeny tiny brush, then scrape off the excess. Had I known this, I would have used a tinted primer — no more white lines!

Tools of the trade when scraping dried paint off glass.

Tools of the trade when scraping dried paint off glass.

Among the other little jobs we’ve accomplished in the past week: installing the ‘extra’ divider that we were left with after the kitchen was installed.  We used it under our sink, an area that we are thrilled to be able to use.  The area under the sink in our previous kitchen was a nightmare of dirty shelves and general ickiness — we couldn’t keep anything that might touch food there.  What a nice change to actually have use of this area.

Under-sink bliss -- no dirt, no mess.

Under-sink bliss — no dirt, no mess.

Our first dinner guests are coming for Thanksgiving dinner in 1 week — I wonder if we’ll be finished with every little thing by then?

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